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Summer Issue 2020

Featured Article

Angie was 47 years old with the Emotional Quotient of a four or five-year-old, if that. She had never considered that an adult pout is really a quiet emotional tantrum—and it was ruining her relationships—one in particular. Enjoy this article: “Fer-de-lance Fiasco.”

Read "Fer-de-lance Fiasco…

Taylor's Resources

As always, all articles, YouTube videos, recipes, games, and practical applications (among other things) are available free from Taylor’s website:  www.ArleneTaylor.org

Two mini-podcast video series will soon be posted:

  • The Doctor Within,” a six-part series about the amazing immune system.
  • Emotional Quotient and Success,” a seven-part series on how to enhance your potential for success. 

These will be available on Taylor’s YouTube channel, "Brain Talk" (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrGmPCpXP0pInonoGnUY3Cg)...

 

Seminar Opportunities

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So far, physical distancing restrictions have not been lifted sufficiently for Taylor to resume a public speaking schedule. It is of paramount importance to stay safe and well. Perhaps a couple of appointments scheduled for late November may occur, but time will tell. Meantime, she is writing and scripting another 12-part mini-podcast series on the Brain and Male-Female Differences.

 

Visit Brain Talk on YouTube…

Selected seminar presentations on YouTube…

Q & A

Q: I was told you said that every brain has a bias related to safety but that racism is learned. How can that be? Answer...

Q: My friend said you made a presentation on Safety Bias. What does that mean? Answer...

Q: I have been told that learned biases form the basis for most inequality. What is your opinion? Answer...

Q: I know some are biased about gender, skin color, and sexual orientation, but I think we are a pretty equalitarian society other than that. Wouldn’t you agree? In my case, I don’t think I have any biases. Answer...

Q: I suppose racism is a type of stereotyping but, hey, everyone does it, right? Answer...

Q. Have you ever experienced discrimination? If so, please help me understand how bias, prejudice, and discrimination differ. Answer...

Q: Recently I attended your week-long seminar and came away with a much more enthusiastic brain. There were some attendees who ask the most ridiculous (or prejudiced, uninformed, rude, unkind) questions. I was amazed how your brain remained calm and civil. How does it do that? Answer...

Q: Several students in my daughter's freshman class have been rude to her for no apparent reason. Some have called her some rather mean nicknames. She is one of only three Asians in the class. Although she has felt like replying in kind at times, she has refrained from doing so. Many times she has come home in tears not understanding what she did to trigger this. What can she do? Answer...

Q: I am somewhat regularly subjected to prejudice because I am in a cross-cultural relationship. We are very happy together, but when the two families are together there is an undertone of prejudice that sometimes isn’t kept in the “undertone.” Sometimes it erupts in arguing about which “race” is better and right in from of the kids. I find it drains my energy. What can I do? We’ve talked about each of us spending time with our own family, maybe a short visit once a week so we are not altogether at the same time. The problem is, I’d like our three children to know both sides of who they are. Answer...

Q: In doing DNA research it appears my family may have some connection with people from Ghana and Nigeria. I have started studying about slavery and am amazed at what I am discovering. It seems that the slave trade itself was primarily done by Europeans—and I always thought it was just an American thing. I also read a CNN article in which I learned a lot. I hear the term “systemic racism” but am not clear what that means. Thanks. Answer...

Q: I am considering going vegan—although am not sure exactly what that means. The rumor has it that you are vegan. Do you have any resources that explain the trend and the benefits? Thanks for your help. Answer...

Q: I hate wearing a mask and don’t really see how that can help much. Do you wear one? Answer...

Q: I want your take on what is going on in the brains of people who stockpile toilet paper. I never heard of anything quite so insane! Did they think the pandemic was going to trigger diarrhea in their households or what? Answer...

Q. Dyslexia runs in my family. I have learned what works for me and how to compensate for what is more difficult. Our son is having some math challenges and the teacher said he probably has something called dyscalculia. I am flummoxed. I never heard of this before! Answer...

Q: Have you ever heard of prosopagnosia? Answer...

More Q&A with Dr. Taylor...

Taylor's Blog

Follow Taylor’s weekday blog and stimulate your brain while learning more brain bits. Access Taylor’s blog:

You may also access Taylor's Blog on Facebook and Twitter.

*Here's how to get Dr. Taylor's blog posts sent to your email address. If you are accessing the blog on your phone, scroll all the way down to the bottom and tap on "View web version." Then (on the phone web version or on your computer or tablet) scroll down, look on the right side, and find the "Follow by Email" window, enter your email address, and click on SUBMIT. You will receive a confirmation email at that address which you must respond to in order to be subscribed to the blog posts.

Follow Taylor's Blog...

Point to Ponder

When a child is exposed to the music of only one culture, in adulthood the brain may find it difficult to apprehend or to produce the nuances of music from other cultures.

Maureen Harris

Studies have shown that young children who are exposed to children of other races and the music of other cultures tend to be more inclusive in adulthood. Parents who also want to give their child(ren) the gift of becoming multilingual in music would do well to expose them very early to the music of differing cultures. The goal is not to find a new favorite, but to help them develop a deeper understanding of musical diversity. This provides an opportunity to appreciate or even to produce the nuances of music from other cultures, which can provide added enrichment and enjoyment in adulthood. If you did not have that opportunity in childhood, listen with your child(ren) or grandchild(ren).

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