Box of Amazing: In Search of Influence  
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Box of Amazing is a weekly digest curated by Rahim covering what's happening now and in the near future from emerging technology to trends and extraordinary articles, hand-picked to broaden your mind and challenge your thinking.

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Editor's Note
Hello from London. 

Welcome to the last quarter of the year. Is anyone on track with the level of uncertainty going on? I feel that I have fallen behind on personal growth, but am back on the podcast roll and using up the dead time. A chunk of my time this weekend has been spent in the search for petroleum - the hard coal face of Brexit repercussions. It might be time for an electric car, finally. It was gas prices last week - no doubt it will be something like internet usage capping next. Apparently, this is what the 70s were like.

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Stay curious!

Onward! - Rahim

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Must Reads
 
1. Searching 2.0 - If you believe what Google is telling us, search is just beginning. Even though we already use the word "google" synonymously with searching on the Internet, but the next level is upon us. "Google SVP Prabhakar Raghavan oversees search alongside Assistant, ads, and other products. He likes to say — and repeated in an interview this past Sunday — that “search is not a solved problem.” That may be true, but the problems he and his team are trying to solve now have less to do with wrangling the web and more to do with adding context to what they find there." The key word there is "context". The promise of context has been long coming and with iterations of Google Lens we will see search becoming more useful to us, primarily due to alogirithms. " Soon, Google says it will leverage capabilities to upgrade Google Lens with the ability to add text to visual searches in order to allow users to ask questions about what they see. In practice, this is how such a feature could work. You could pull up a photo of a shirt you like in Google Search, then tap on the Lens icon and ask Google to find you the same pattern — but on a pair of socks. By typing in something like “socks with this pattern,” you could direct Google to find relevant queries in a way that may have been more difficult to do if you had only used text input alone." And that's just for socks. Verge Techcrunch

2. Influential - Influencer culture has intrigued me as it has evolved past just bloggers to YouTubers, Instagrammers through to Tiktok. A small percentage of of Gen Z are making a living,(a very good living!) from just being themselves. Influencers are not becoming so just by luck. They are deep-diving on niches, they're following rules to be aligned with brands and growing tribes. "On LinkedIn, the share of job postings for roles with the words ‘influencer’ or ‘brand partnerships’ through July of this year grew 52% from the same period last year, according to an analysis done for The Times." The article delves into the drivers of what makes an influencer, how much they earn and how they pivot themselves for success. LA Times
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Want to know everything that Amazon is up to? Now you can with 'What Did Amazon Do This Week?', written and curated by Paul Armstrong (Forbes, Reuters, author of 'Disruptive Technologies'), the weekly newsletter chart where everyone's favourite cardboard abuser is going. Whether it's content, retail, technology or everything else, it'll be in your inbox. 33% of subscribers work for Amazon...so you know it's good! Link

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Recommended Reads

Now


1. The Largest Autocracy on Earth Link
2. We are already barrelling towards the next pandemic Link
3. Climate Change Is the New Dot-Com Bubble Link
4. The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time Link
5. Our Brains Were Not Built for This Much Uncertainty Link

Near

1. The future of women at work: Transitions in the age of automation Link
2. Humans could definitely live to 130 Link
3. Cancer Without Chemotherapy: ‘A Totally Different World’ Link
4. MIT establishes new initiative to meld humans and machines Link
5. Leaked Documents Show How Amazon’s Astro Robot Tracks Everything You Do Link
Recommended Links
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2021 LinkedIn Edelman B2B Thought Leadership Impact Report Link

Book Recommendation: Mo Gawdat: Scary Smart: The Future of Artificial Intelligence and How You Can Save Our World Link

How Big Tech Runs Tech Projects and the Curious Absence of Scrum: A survey of how tech projects run across the industry highlights Scrum being absent from Big Tech. Why is this, and are there takeaways others should take note of? Link

The Cyber Monoculture Risk Link

Brain Cut and Paste: Samsung Electronics Puts Forward a Vision To ‘Copy and Paste’ the Brain on Neuromorphic Chips Link

First Artificial Kidney That Would Free People From Dialysis and Transplants Runs on Blood Pressure Link 

AR Snap Ads: Snap partners WPP to launch AR Lab for brands Link

How Quizlet does smarter grading: Using ML and NLP to grade millions of answers Link
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