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First of all, THANK YOU everyone who came and participated in Classroom at Entrance last week. It was so special. I learned so much about rats, beetles, pigeons, and ants. Its a really good feeling to find space amid Labor Day, NYFW, and gallery openings, to learn and discuss our lives with other species.
IFIAAR is also participating in a new experimental art fair in Portland, OR ending today called the Utopian Vision Art Fair! While I personally couldn't be there, ambassadors for the organization created an amazing park kiosk filled with vital information. It includes work by Lisa Schonberg, Mixed Needs, and Shawn Creeden.

COMING UP
SEPTEMBER 20-23      New York Art Book Fair. Table A03 in the zine tent.
"Yeah, yeah, but your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could that they didn't stop to think if they should." - Dr. Ian Malcom
You cannot share your life with a dog, as I had done in Bournemouth, or a cat, and not know perfectly well that animals have personalities and minds and feelings.
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/jane_goodall_471127
You cannot share your life with a dog, as I had done in Bournemouth, or a cat, and not know perfectly well that animals have personalities and minds and feelings.
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/jane_goodall_471127
You cannot share your life with a dog, as I had done in Bournemouth, or a cat, and not know perfectly well that animals have personalities and minds and feelings.
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/jane_goodall_471127- Murray Bookchin

Greetings humans

For better or worse, these newsletters will also be a personal space to ramble about my own thoughts and confusion around our relationships and scenarios with non-human animals. Feel free to stop reading now. I may not always be right or even on the right track about things, but my brain has been spinning for years over these topics. I'd like to include things like useful links, news stories, etc, but I also have to exist in my other space as a working artist where time is always of the essence.

I recently re-watched the original Jurassic Park trilogy in lieu of their disastrous attempt to reignite the classic genetics horror story. More and more, the manipulation of genes pervades discussions of human survival, medicine, animal husbandry, and endangered species strategy. Since Crichton originally wrote the book in 1990 amid the first stretch of research and technology that led to the birth of Dolly (bless her, lived 7 years), the imagination has swelled, along with the reality, at what can happen and what WE can do. Inevitably, the fictional takes end more or less the same: bad things happen. “If there is one thing the history of evolution has taught us it's that life will not be contained. Life breaks free, it expands to new territories and crashes through barriers, painfully, maybe even dangerously, but, uh... well, there it is.”
Life also disappears before we have the chance to measure it, tag it, put it behind bars, or kill it violently.


This summer we said goodbye to Koko, one of the most important non-human ambassadors we’ve ever had. She was 46 years old and a life-long resident of California. In my personal life volunteering at the Hi Desert Nature Museum, Friday, the cockatiel and Jackie, the Mojave ground squirrel died in one week. I found a young dead dove, identical to the one I was raising and considering its ability to be released. These were followed by the death of Mergatroyd, a California Quail seized through a murder case but a friendly, gentle, and attentive shoulder-dweller. I returned to NYC only to have Cleopatra, my snake of the last 4 years die the day after of unknown causes. And while I began writing this, Tahlequah, part of J pod in the Pacific NW, was carrying her dead calf for the 17th day on her tour of mourning.

These deaths are small deaths, and yet they give me a rush of fear over how we might see things play out in our lives, waves of change, death, mourning. The idea of prediction is to prepare us, to give us the knowledge and the tools to believe we know what is to come. We have no idea what’s going to happen on this planet. We can’t bring back what we’ve lost and understand how it will work. Despite every break-through and research project, the balance is gone and our tools tend to have unexpected consequences. If we keep dreaming of tools and innovations to save us or to resurrect species from the dead, we’ll lose track of the individuals around us now that are crying for help. As in the movies though no one ever seems to listen to the warnings.
That is the lesson I've found in Dr. Ian Malcom’s chaos theory. Welcome to the unknown.

Rest in Peace my friends. I'm so sorry to see you go.



 

IFIAAR


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Institute for Interspecies Art and Relations · 751 Bushwick Ave · Brooklyn, Ny 11221 · USA

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