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Youth Bullying Prevention Program…
It Takes A District

Tools, Tips, Research and Opportunities to Reduce Bullying
and Support A Positive School Climate
Welcome to the bullying prevention monthly email blast. This information is intended to provide ideas for you to use or share with your school to build a positive school culture and support all students.

Please feel free to reach out with any questions or requests for specific information that you would like to see in upcoming issues.
This month’s highlights are presented below. The goal, as always, is to specifically address any incidents reported while also learning more about what makes schools safe.

Identifying isolated students: Students who are isolated, or who have few or no friends, are at particular risk for being bullied. They are also among the students least likely to report their experiences. This teacher’s approach to finding out which of her students is isolated or disconnected from their peers is one that can be easily incorporated into weekly planning time. One of my favorite DC teachers shared it with me and I hope you share it with the teachers in your building.

Text-based trauma support for students: Although OHR does not endorse any particular program or strategy, and strongly believes that each school must select the programs and practices that are right for its community, we are committed to raising awareness of strategies that other schools are using. MindRight is a nonprofit organization with the mission of empowering youth of color to heal from trauma resulting from systemic oppression. They partner with schools to provide daily, evidence-informed mental health coaching over text message to students impacted by trauma. If you'd like learn more about partnering with MindRight at your school, please email founders@getmindright.org.

Students who bully need support, not ire: This opinion piece from the Washington Post highlights why we must remember that bullying is a behavior, not a child. Instead of blaming children who bully, we need to address the underlying needs of those students and provide positive supports for students that are targeted. The long view is important to addressing the immediate behavior. 

Remember that the Youth Bullying Prevention Act of 2012 requires all schools in the District of Columbia to provide information on all reported and confirmed bullying incidents every two years. We will request these data at the end of the 2017/2018 school year. To assist in this process, we have provided a spreadsheet tool (.xlsx) to help you compile the data requested.
 
Suzanne Greenfield
Director, Citywide Bullying Prevention Program
Pronouns – she, her, hers 
 
District of Columbia Office of Human Rights
441 4th Street, N.W., Suite 570N
Washington, D.C.  20001
 
Main: 202.727.4559
Direct: 202.727.0455
Cell: 202.834.6376
Fax: 202.727.9589
District of Columbia Office of Human Rights
441 4th Street, N.W., Suite 570N
Washington, D.C.  20001

Main: 202.727.4559
Direct: 202.727.0455
Cell: 202.834.6376
Fax: 202.727.9589

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