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Youth Bullying Prevention Program…
It Takes A District

Tools, Tips, Research and Opportunities to Reduce Bullying
and Support A Positive School Climate
Welcome to the bullying prevention monthly email blast. I hope you like our new look. November may not be Bullying Prevention Month, but our work does not happen over just a single month—it is an ongoing process to build positive school culture and support all students. That is why my office will continue sending these blasts to highlight useful information that furthers such a process.
On January 18, the Citywide Bullying Prevention Program started a conversation with school resource officers (SRO) that I hope will lead to better collaboration and support for students. I would urge you all to reach out to the SRO that supports your school to be sure that they know who you are and how to get in touch with you.

The law requires that you, as the point of contact
, be in charge of all investigations of bullying. It is critical that you know immediately about a concern or complaint so that you can put supports in place to ensure that students feel safe while you look into the situation to determine appropriate next steps. We also want to be sure that mediations do not occur in cases of bullying.

I want to thank my colleague Adam Lustig from DCPS central office for joining me in this conversation. Please reach out to me,
Suzanne.Greenfield@dc.gov, or to Adam.Lustig@dc.gov, if you have any questions or concerns.
This month’s highlights are presented below. The goal, as always, is to specifically address any incidents reported while also learning more about what makes schools safe.

Tips for parents on how to support a bullied child: In this article, Rosalind Wiseman, author of Queen Bees and Wannabes and an expert on bullying and youth relationships, provides constructive ways to address and support children who have experienced bullying. This article may also be helpful for teachers to support their students in the classroom.

Trauma-informed schools in a nutshell: Sometimes it is just helpful to have a visual reminder about how to approach our students and our work. We ofeen talk about a trauma-informed approach, which can be summarized in six steps:
Remember that the Youth Bullying Prevention Act of 2012 requires all schools in the District of Columbia to provide information on all reported and confirmed bullying incidents every two years. We will request these data at the end of the 2017/2018 school year. To assist in this process, we have provided a spreadsheet tool (.xlsx) to help you compile the data requested.
 
Suzanne Greenfield
Director, Citywide Bullying Prevention Program
Pronouns – she, her, hers 
 
District of Columbia Office of Human Rights
441 4th Street, N.W., Suite 570N
Washington, D.C.  20001
 
Main: 202.727.4559
Direct: 202.727.0455
Cell: 202.834.6376
Fax: 202.727.9589
District of Columbia Office of Human Rights
441 4th Street, N.W., Suite 570N
Washington, D.C.  20001

Main: 202.727.4559
Direct: 202.727.0455
Cell: 202.834.6376
Fax: 202.727.9589

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