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Youth Bullying Prevention Program…
It Takes A District

Tools, Tips, Research and Opportunities to Reduce Bullying
and Support A Positive School Climate
Welcome to the bullying prevention monthly email blast. This information is meant to provide ideas for you to use or share with your school to build a positive school culture and support all students.

Please feel free to reach out with any questions or requests for specific information that you would like to see in upcoming issues.
This month’s highlights are presented below. The goal, as always, is to specifically address any incidents reported while also learning more about what makes schools safe.

Note: The link to Bullying Prevention Tips for Parents has been updated.

When middle schoolers say #MeToo. As the national conversation on sexual harassment continues, this blog post highlights how such behavior—and our responses to the behavior—affects even our students on a daily basis. As educators, we must critically consider both our implicit and explicit message that “boys will be boys” and how that message lessens the experience of those affected.

I have this thing called autism.” Students with disabilities are particularly at risk for experiencing bullying victimization. Helping students understand their classmates’ disabilities can help prevent bullying. This video allows staff and students to hear directly from a young person with autism. While it is only one person’s story, it is also an opportunity to open up the discussion, de-mystify behaviors, and build empathy.

Bullying prevention tips for parents. The Youth Bullying Prevention Program created this pamphlet for parents and caregivers in the city to understand what bullying is,how talk to their children about their experiences, and how to engage with their school to ensure that behaviors are addressed and students are supported. The pamphlet is available in English, Spanish, French, Amharic, and Chinese, and is printer-ready for distribution to your school’s community.
 
Remember that the Youth Bullying Prevention Act of 2012 requires all schools in the District of Columbia to provide information on all reported and confirmed bullying incidents every two years. We will request these data at the end of the 2017/2018 school year. To assist in this process, we have provided a spreadsheet tool (.xlsx) to help you compile the data requested.
 
Suzanne Greenfield
Director, Citywide Bullying Prevention Program
Pronouns – she, her, hers 
 
District of Columbia Office of Human Rights
441 4th Street, N.W., Suite 570N
Washington, D.C.  20001
 
Main: 202.727.4559
Direct: 202.727.0455
Cell: 202.834.6376
Fax: 202.727.9589
District of Columbia Office of Human Rights
441 4th Street, N.W., Suite 570N
Washington, D.C.  20001

Main: 202.727.4559
Direct: 202.727.0455
Cell: 202.834.6376
Fax: 202.727.9589

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