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"Found in Translation" in large black text. To the left, the Bodies in Translation logo, which has overlapping circles in blue, green, red, and yellow.
WELCOME TO OUR FALL 2020 NEWSLETTER
Bodies In Translation is about partnerships, activism, art, technology, and access to life. Our newsletter, Found in Translation, published twice a year, provides a springboard for BIT collaborations and highlights some of the amazing work that we have underway. Subscribe here

We are all experiencing intense and powerful times right now. We're thinking of you, our friends, colleagues and communities, and hope you find some connection through the stories included here. We miss meeting with you in person, the bridges we build when we gather, the solace we find in each other's physical presence. At the same time, we're inspired to explore the creative and experimental responses we have within these shifting climates as we find our way. And still, despite the barriers, unsafety, and injustice, we are connected. We're sending love and warm wishes to and from everyone at Bodies in Translation. 
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CRIPPING THE ARTS DOCUMENTARY
Preview image is a photo of Erin Ball performing at Cripping the Arts, the air full of confetti that she has shot out of her prosthetic leg.

Image description for video preview: A photo of Erin Ball performing at Cripping the Arts. Ball is a young, white woman. Confetti shoots out of her prosthetic leg and is in the air all around her.

We are thrilled to share the Cripping the Arts Documentary! Cripping the Arts was a three-day international symposium held in January 2019 at Harbourfront Centre in Toronto. It gathered people who share a belief that Deaf, Disability, and Mad arts and activism change how we understand difference, and how we create and experience art and culture. This documentary highlights some of the memorable moments from the event.

The 8-minute doc was made by filmmaker Kavya Yoganathan and produced by Bodies in Translation: Activist Art, Technology and Access to Life, Re•Vision: The Centre for Art and Social Justice, University of Guelph in partnership with the Cripping the Arts presenting partners: Creative Users Projects, Tangled Art + Disability, Ryerson University School of Disability Studies, British Council Canada, and Harbourfront Centre. An audio-described version of the documentary will be available soon.

TRANSLATION ROUNDTABLE WITH ARTSEVERYWHERE
Vanessa Dion Fletcher’s annotated version of Eliza Chandler’s provocation for the roundtable. It has Dion Fletcher’s handwritten annotations in Lenape, and some doodles, overtop of Chandler’s typed text.
Image description: Vanessa Dion Fletcher’s annotated version of Eliza Chandler’s provocation for the roundtable. It has Dion Fletcher’s handwritten annotations in Lenape, and some doodles, overtop of Chandler’s typed text.

The Roundtable on Translation explores artists’ reflections on how accessibility impacts experiences of art and art making. Co-presented in September 2020 by Bodies in Translation and ArtsEverywhere and co-curated by Elwood Jimmy and Tracy Tidgwell, the Translation Roundtable features a provocation by Eliza Chandler and artistic interventions by Alex Bulmer, Taeyoon Choi, Vanessa Dion Fletcher, Elwood Jimmy, Carmen Papalia, Jenelle Rouse, Gloria Swain, and Sky Stonefish. 

These reflections offer us timely insight into different ways of knowing and being that many of us have always held close, and have been shaped through living and loving interdependently. They reveal how normative conventions, entitlements, habits, and desires oppress and need to be disrupted. They show us that the multi-dimensional ways that we can be and are together even while faced with great pain, tension, and uncertainty, and calls us to reconnect to our capacity to take care of one another in small and big ways. 

INTO THE LIGHT DOCUMENTARY FOR EDUCATIONAL RELEASE
Mona Stonefish speaks into a microphone. Mona is an Onkwehón:we Elder with long silver and black braids. Her name and title, "Mona Stonefish Elder and Co-Curator," is displayed in the lower right corner of the video still. At the lower centre of the image there's a caption that reads, "That I am with you."
Image description of video preview: Mona Stonefish speaks into a microphone. Mona is an Onkwehón:we Elder with long silver and black braids. Her name and title, "Mona Stonefish Elder and Co-Curator," is displayed in the lower right corner of the video still. At the lower centre of the image there's a caption that reads, "That I am with you."
Into the Light: Eugenics and Education in Southern Ontario, the documentary, is now available for educational use!

In this segment from the film, Elder Mona Stonefish reflects upon her grandmother's loving advice to her as a child when she was forcibly taken from her family and placed in the Mohawk Institute, Indian Residential School.

Into the Light: Eugenics and Education in Southern Ontario is an 37-minute documentary account of an award-winning exhibition of the same name that brought one of Canada’s dark secrets of eugenics, as well as stories of survival, out of the shadows and into the light.

The doc reveals over thirty years of eugenics education, including courses taught at the post-secondary level in central Canada, and highlights the efforts and stories of members of affected communities and the people who continue to work to foster social justice, including responding to Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Featuring the exhibition co-creators and co-curators Elder Mona Stonefish, Peter Park, Dolleen Tisawii’ashii Manning, Evadne Kelly, Seika Boye and Sky Stonefish, the doc explores how they work to prevent institutional brutality, 

colonialism, ableism, and social injustice. Into the Light is co-presented by Guelph Museums, ARCH Disability Law, Respecting Rights, and Bodies in Translation: Activist Art, Technology and Access to Life, a project of Re•Vision: The Centre for Art & Social Justice at the University of Guelph.

Into the Light in the Classroom

Into the Light has great pedagogical value and potential for social justice-oriented faculty and students. The documentary may be integrated into courses. The film extends to studies in disability, decolonizing, social and political dimensions of bodies, difference, sexuality, archives, museum studies, history of sociology, psychology and anthropology, history of public health, education, and domestic science, Canadian history and the history of science, race and racism, equity, human rights law and policy, and more.

For access to the Into the Light documentary for private in-class viewing please contact Tracy Tidgwell at Bodies in Translation  at ttidgwell@uoguelph.ca. For more pedagogical resources on eugenics and Into the Light contact Evadne Kelly at evadnekelly@gmail.com
DIRECT[MESSAGE]: DIGITAL ACCESS TO ARTISTIC ENGAGEMENT BY AND FOR OLDER ADULTS
The words "direct[message] Digital Access to Artistic Engagement” in white, over a black and white image of an older white woman sitting at a table and drawing.
Image description: The words "direct[message] Digital Access to Artistic Engagement” in white, over a black and white image of an older white woman sitting at a table and drawing.

Direct[Message]: Digital Access to Artistic Engagement is a collaborative community-arts project created by and for older adults in Ontario. This partnership between Centre3 For Artistic and Social Practice, VibraFusionLab, Subtle Technologies, McMaster University, Bodies in Translation, and Re•Vision: The Centre for Art & Social Justice is a team of artists, community members, researchers, and designers who working to make the arts more accessible and interactive through digital technology. We're co-designing, developing and evaluating physical devices and digital applications that would make it easy for older adults to access and participate in artistic programs. 

Direct[Message] is seeking participation from Older Adults in Hamilton, Guelph and London Ontario between ages 60-75 to take part in various activities, including creating and contributing content ideas to the the Direct[Message] Community Youtube Channel

Get in touch and follow Direct[Message] through our websiteInstagram and YouTube.

DEAF INTERIORS

An empty, white chair sits in the center of a Zoom meeting window. There is a white background behind the chair with soft shadows.
Image Description: An empty, white chair sits in the center of a Zoom meeting window. There is a white background behind the chair with soft shadows.

In August 2020, Creative Users Projects, in partnership with Tangled Arts, Deaf Spectrum, Bodies in Translation, and the City of Toronto’s Cultural Hotspot, commissioned 6 Deaf artists to participate in an online creative development program with lead facilitation by guest artists Sage Lovell and Peter Owusu-Ansah. Selected artists gathered as a group for 6 online sessions to collaborate on the development of ideas, share feedback, and co-create digital works of art.

Deaf Interiors is a provocative demonstration of Deaf art and culture, activism, and connection that speaks to the social and economic challenges of our modern era during a world health crisis. Using Zoom as a central medium, artists will explore ‘new norms’ in communication and creative practice in light of COVID-19—culminating in a series of digital “interiors” present to the public through online channels in late fall 2020. Stay tuned! 

BITS & BYTES
Share your news! We'd love to highlight your projects, artwork, events and scholarship on our social media channels and in the Found in Translation newsletter. Email us at revisionsocial@uoguelph.ca

Check out the many new entries in our
Arts + Activism Directory! An excellent resource for curators, producers and scholars, the directory recognizes, commemorates, and documents activism in the arts. If you’re an artist and would like a directory profile, please contact us through the Directory page

Welcome Rana El Kadi to the BIT team! As Research Associate on the Accessing the Arts project, Rana is working with communities with lived experiences of disability and difference across Canada to co-create and co-design digital solutions that make difference discoverable and vital. She is also the Research Lead on Direct[Message], an intergenerational research and development project that aims to make the arts more accessible and inclusive for older adults through digital technology, another BIT partnership project. 

Disruptions 05: Elwood Jimmy on Imagining Wiser Futures Through the Senses, is a workshop happening on November 12, 2020 at 1 PM EST, presented by Carlton University Art Gallery as part of “Disruptions: Dialogues on Disability Art." Curated by Michael Orsini to generate dialogue about contemporary art as a force for challenging ableism. 

Relaxed Performance: Exploring Access. For three weeks, from November 18th - December 8th, Bodies in Translation, British Council and Tangled Art + Disability will investigate the principles and practices of Relaxed Performance in a digital context. Each week we'll introduce animating questions about RP, deepen the conversation with a short video reflections from arts practitioners, and share print materials and resources useful to arts organizations, scholars, and the public. Read the full RP research report here. 

Crip Times, coming soon, is a new interview podcast series with disability-identified artists hosted by Kristina McMullin, Yousef Kadoura, and Kayla Besse, co-presented by Tangled Art + Disability and Bodies in Translation, hosted on Andrew Gurza’s Wheels on the Ground podcast network. We can’t wait to share it with you! 

Cripping Masculinity is looking for 60-70 Disability, Deaf, and/or Mad-identified men (cis and trans) and masculine-identified non-binary people living in Toronto and Edmonton who are over the age of 18 to take part in their research project on disability, gender and clothing. Please email CrippingMasculinity@ryerson.ca if you're interested in participating.

CFP: Contemporary Vulnerabilities, Plans Unraveled: Reflections on Social Justice Methodologies is a book collection of critical reflections about vulnerable moments in our research processes. Intersectional and interdisciplinary proposals welcome. For the full CFP contact Chelsea Jones cjones@brocku.ca or Claire Carter claire.carter@uregina.ca

Creative Users Projects has started Network Connector, a shared online network of artists, service providers, and consultants - anybody working in or interested in working in Deaf, Mad and disability culture, accessibility, and the arts! To get involved, submit your profile here.

EC3 is hiring an Arts Program and Production Assistant. The deadline for applications is November 23, 2020. See the job posting for more information.

Post-Code Tour, presented by ArtsWeek Peterborough, curated by Hannah Keating, features local artists Derek Newman-Stille, Sioux Lily and Bethany LeBlonc in a futuristic digital exploration of iconic local sites that reimagines them through the lens of disability and accessibility. The project starts November 9 on Instagram - follow @post_code_tour to watch it unfold.
 
CONGRATULATIONS
Dolleen Tisawii’ashii Manning, BIT co-applicant and collaborator, scholar, artist, teacher, engaged community member and colleague, for her new position with the Department of Philosophy and the Cultural Studies Program at Queen’s University. 

Eliza Chandler, BIT Co-director for being named to the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists, which recognizes emerging leadership across disciplines.

Stephanie Springgay, BIT co-applicant and collaborator, artist, curator and leading scholar in the emerging field of research-creation for her the new  position as director of McMaster’s School of the Arts in the Faculty of Humanities.

Elder Mona Stonefish for her nomination as the new namesake for Macdonald Hall, University of Windsor, to be renamed the Mona Kahawane Stonefish House. BIT is honoured to uplift this nomination with a letter of support. A huge thank you to our BIT collaborators who signed on to this letter. 

Chelsea Temple Jones, BIT Research Associate on the Accessing the Arts and Relaxed Performance projects, for her new position as Assistant Professor in the Department of Child and Youth Studies at Brock University. 
CONTRIBUTORS
Thank you to Lindsay Fisher and Creative Users Projects for contributing the Deaf Interiors project, and to Kayla Besse and Tracy Tidgwell for writing Issue 6.
ABOUT THIS NEWSLETTER
Found in Translation is a newsletter for, by, and about the Bodies in Translation partnership grant. Bodies in Translation: Activist Art, Technology, and Access to Life is a research project that creates collaborative partnerships between artists, arts organizations, activists, scholars, and educators. We cultivate activist art produced by disabled, d/Deaf, fat, Mad, and E/elder people with the goal of expanding understandings of vitality and advancing social justice. Bodies in Translation has its home at Re·Vision: The Centre for Art and Social Justice at the University of Guelph and is co-led by Dr. Carla Rice at the University of Guelph and Dr. Eliza Chandler at Ryerson University. www.bodiesintranslation.ca
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A NOTE ABOUT ACCESSIBILITY
We recognize that accessibility is a dynamic process. If you find any part of this newsletter inaccessible to you or if you have any suggestions for how we might make Found in Translation more accessible in content, language, tone, style, etc., we would love your feedback. Email us at revisionsocial@uoguelph.ca
LICENSING
The content of this newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-Sharealike license. This means that others may build on or alter content when it is re-shared. The content must be only used for non-commercial purposes and the original work must be attributed to the BIT Found in Translation newsletter. Users must also license the new work under the same license. For more information about Creative Commons licensing, please visit: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/. Content that is shared here but created by others (for example, found on external links) may be subject to different licensing.
Bodies in Translation: Activist Art, Technology and Access to Life is a project of Re•Vision: The Centre for Art and Social Justice at the University of Guelph. Our research is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.
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