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SILENT COMEDY WEEKEND FESTIVAL 10TH-11TH MARCH CLICK TO BUY TICKETS

Dear Friends of The Kennington Bioscope & The Cinema Museum

On Wed 7th February our second half feature will be Carl Theodor Dreyer’s "The Bride of Glomdal" (1926). 

The Bride of Glomdal immediately followed Dreyer’s 'Master of the House' (1925) and preceded his move to France, where his international reputation was made with 'The Passion of Joan of Arc' (1928).' 

The feature is preceded by a collection of newly restored suffragette shorts & news reel items courtesy of Bob Geoghehan and a fiction short courtesy of David Wyatt.

'The Bride of Glomdal' (1926)

'Tore takes over the rundown family farm. Applying his youthful energy, he intends to make it into a big farm like Glomgården on the other side of the river, where beautiful Berit loves. Tore falls in love with her, but her father has promised her to rich Gjermund. As her wedding to Gjermund draws near, Berit runs away and seeks refuge with Tore and his parents. She soon falls deathly ill but recovers, asking for, and getting, her father’s permission to marry Tore. Jealous Gjermund is determined to prevent their wedding, however, in a dramatic climactic scene playing out around the rushing river.' BIRGIT GRANHØJ
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'Among the highlights of the recent Pordenone Silent Film Festival were the examples of Norwegian cinema, perhaps most notably Carl Theodor Dreyer’s adaptation of a novel by Jacob Breda Bull, The Bride of Glomdal (Glomdalsbruden).

To accommodate the theatre schedules of his actors, and to embellish what he believed to be the relatively slender plot threads of the original, Dreyer uncharacteristically shot more or less off-the-cuff, albeit with a prepared list of scenes, throughout the summer of 1925. The rural locations provide a beautiful setting for this story of Tore, a young farmer, who is determined to build up his family’s dilapidated farm and win the hand of lovely neighbour Berit, who is promised in marriage to another.' GM

Accompanied on the piano by John Sweeney

A programme of silent shorts precedes the main film.

Anyone interested in silent film should visit the website for more info.

NOTES FROM THE 36TH PORDENONE FILM FESTIVAL:

Just before Dreyer went to France to become famous in world film
history  with  La  Passion  de  Jeanne  d’Arc he  made  
The  Bride  of  Glomdal for  the  Norwegian-Swedish  company  Victoria-Film  in  
Norway  in  the  summer  of  1925.  The  film  is  based  on  a  novel  of  
the same title by Norwegian author Jacob Breda Bull (1853-1930),
and  is  a  classic  example  of  the  Norwegian  Village  film,  in  which  
contemporary  love  stories  take  place  in  sunny  Norwegian  villages.  

Since  the  actors  only  had  the  summer  off  from  their  respective  theatre  contracts,  Dreyer  for  the  first  and  last  time  in  his  career  
decided  to  be  looser  in  the  preparations  for  a  film  –  the  shooting  
was  virtually  improvised  from  day  to  day,  without  a  script.  A  list  
of  individual  scenes  was  made,  though,  including  some  narrative  
elements from Bull’s novel 'Eline Vangen', since Dreyer felt that the
novel Glomdalsbruden didn’t contain enough story elements.

Dreyer  is  loyal  to  Bull’s  novels  in  terms  of  narrative  elements  and  
thematic content. Thematically both novels contain a central social
criticism  of  parents  arranging  the  marriage  of  their  children,  and  
in both plots the clergy steps in and restores moral justice.

Dreyer adopts this view of the basic conflict in Bull’s novels – thus it is the
only  time  where  the  clergy  becomes  the  moral  voice  in  a  Dreyer  
film.  Dreyer’s  representation  of  the  characters  to  some  extent  
departs from Bull, especially in his depiction of Berit and Gjermund.
In the film, Berit is more rebellious against her father’s decision to
marry her to Gjermund. In the scene in which the marriage is being
arranged, she declares: “They are in there negotiating as if I were a
piece of cattle!” This line is not in Bull’s original novel. The depiction
of  Gjermund  is  perhaps  the  best  example  showing  that  Dreyer’s  
humanism is more inclusive than Bull’s. In Bull’s story, Gjermund is
described in an unequivocally negative manner, while in Dreyer’s film
he too is seen as a victim of the old men’s bargaining.
In many descriptions of The Bride of Glomdal it is assumed that
the film is relatively complete, but at the premiere in Oslo the film’s
length was 2525 metres, whereas the surviving material is only 1250
metres.  The  surviving  version,  though  coherent  and  logical,  differs  
considerably from what appears in the original Norwegian title list
Probably  a  re-editing  took  place  around  the  time  of  the  Danish  
premiere  on  15  April  1926.  By  comparing  some  production  stills  
from an illustrated version of the novel with the Norwegian title list,
and the Norwegian and Danish printed film programmes, it becomes
clear  that  much  footage  is  missing,  especially  the  sequences  from  
'Eline  Vangen' giving  a  more  nuanced  depiction  of  Thore  and  his  
family. The most important loss is a longer sequence, in which Berit
stays with Thore’s family after falling from a horse. During her stay
we witness several erotic flirtations and Thore’s desperate drinking
binges,  which  lead  to  confrontations  with  his  father.  In  addition,  
several  scenes  seem  to  have  been  longer,  with  more  dialogue  (the  
Norwegian title list contains 30% more intertitles than the Danish).
A number of lyrical nature sequences were probably also cut. Dreyer
himself stated, “I have realized that the poor peasant’s son in the
film  is  depicted  in  rough  surroundings,  whereas  the  rich  farmer’s  
daughter is surrounded by a gentler nature.”

This use of nature as a social contrast (a motif that also appears in
Synnöve Solbakken) is  not  very  obvious  in  the  existing  film,  possibly  because  of  its  shortening after the premiere.

It is impossible to get a complete picture of the film as it looked at
the premiere in Oslo. However, the surviving version of
The  Bride of Glomdal  does  not  change  the  overall  impression,  that  the  film  
is  an  interesting  and  charming  parenthesis  in  Dreyer’s  
oeuvre. In which, true to his nature, he criticizes the oppression of women and
promotes a classical conciliatory humanism.
The restoration of
The Bride of Glomdal was conducted by the Danish Film  Institute  in  2009,  supervised  by Thomas  Christensen.  The  digital  
transfer  was  done  from  a  new  preservation  master  struck  from  a  
negative held at the Norwegian National Library. New combined Danish/ English  intertitles  were  produced  to  replace  the  German  flash-titles  in  
the preservation materials. The DCP has been transferred at 17 frames
per second, giving the restored version a running time of just under 75
minutes. – Morten Egholm
'The Bride of Glomdal'

CAST

Einar Sissener             Tore Braaten
Tove Tellback               Berit Glomgaarden
Stub Wiberg                 Ola Glomgaarden
Harald Stormoen          Jakob Braaten
Alfhild Stormoen           Kari Braaten, hans hustru
Oscar Larsen               Berger Haugsett
Einar Tveito                  Gjermund Haugsett, hans sønn
Rasmus Rasmussen     Presten
Sofie Reimers               Prestefruen
Julie Lampe                  Gammel-Guri
Henny Skjønberg          Hushjelp i prestegården
Doors open -  6.30pm.
Films start  - 7.30pm.
Intermission -  8.30pm

Main feature - 8.45pm


We aim to finish our events by 10.15pm.

Admission £5 on the door.

THESE TIMES ARE VERY APPROXIMATE AND VARY DEPENDING ON FILM SPEEDS AND PROGRAMMING FROM WEEK TO WEEK.

 

How to find us

The Cinema Museum is located in Kennington, close to the Elephant and Castle.
Address: The Master’s House, 2 Dugard Way (off Renfrew Road), London SE11 4TH

Transport

Nearest tube/train stations: Kennington (Northern Line) and Elephant and Castle (Northern and Bakerloo lines, and BR) are both within easy walking distance.

Bus routes: Routes 109, 133, 155, 159, 196, 333 and 415 stop within 3 minutes’ walk; 1, 12, 35, 40, 45, 53, 63, 68, 100, 148, 168, 171, 172, 17, 188, 468, 453, C10, 363, 343, 344 and P5 all stop at the Elephant and Castle; additionally routes 3, 59 and 159 along Kennington Road are also under 10 minutes’ walk away.

Parking: Cycle parking provided. Limited parking is available at the Museum. The Museum is within the Congestion Charging zone, which operates until 6pm Mon-Fri. After 6.30pm and at weekends there is free parking in surrounding streets.

Access

Full disabled access is available.

Nearest tube:
Kennington
The Cinema Museum
2 Dugard Way (off Renfrew Road)
London SE11 4TH

Visit the site for the information on the next show.

ADMISSION TO THE KB  IS ONLY £5 BUT PLEASE CAN YOU CONSIDER MAKING A SMALL DONATION TO THE CINEMA MUSEUM DURING YOUR VISIT AS THE EVENT IS ONLY POSSIBLE THROUGH THE KIND GENEROSITY OF THE MUSEUM'S VOLUNTEERS.
 
THE MUSEUM IS AN EXPENSIVE VENUE TO KEEP OPEN AND RECEIVES NO ARTS COUNCIL FUNDING. THIS EVENT IS IN AID OF THE CINEMA MUSEUM  THANK YOU.
 
Ticket revenue information:
 
£4 goes directly to the Cinema Museum to help cover the costs of running the venue, and £1 goes towards to cost of acquiring prints and licenses.

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Kennington Bioscope · Flat 3 Lytton House · 31 Bulwer Street · Hammersmith And Fulham, London W128as · United Kingdom

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