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March   2 0 2 0

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Mountain Cottontail
Sylvilagus nuttaliii
Joan Gilbert

We had a fantastic February!

Coho Game On the Road

Wallowology's Coho 500 game made the perilous journey downstream to the Nez Perce Tribe's Fisheries Conference in Lewiston on February 12.  Conceived and designed by Joan Gilbert, Wallowology's former Art Director, in conjunction with the Tribe's fisheries office in Joseph, Coho 500 is a classic Wallowology product- an iconic overlay of art and science with a compelling life lesson about the challenges salmon face for survival.  Wallowology Senior Photographer Dave Jensen and Systems Ecologist Dr David Mildrexler attended the event with Joan.

(photos by David Jensen and Joan Gilbert)
Meanwhile at home in Joseph . . . Tracking!
On Feb 20 we were lucky to have Jaszu Borzencki join us at the center for a talk on tracking. Jaszu is really knowledgeable and passionate about tracking and education. He brought sample tracks, casts, and other materials that he used as props during his presentation. He mixed in plenty of stories. The audience was engaged and enjoyed it. Thank you, Jaszu!


If you have any tracking questions, or you are looking for someone to go tracking with, please feel free to contact Jaszu directly at lpgspr@gmail.com,

Welcome to the Reading Corner!


We're going to squeeze in one more great science book to read before spring takes us outside. So if you're looking to curl up in a cozy armchair with a good book, this month we offer you the new collection of essays, The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2019.  “Science is important because this is how we seek to discover the truth about the world. And this is what makes excellent science and nature writing essential,” observes New York Times best-selling author Sy Montgomery who edited this collection. 

This is the last month of the Reading Corner, featuring books that celebrate science and the natural world. We'll be back with more great reads next winter. Til then we hope you enjoy this one. 

Where We Go From Here


Given recommendations to practice social distancing, the Wallowology Discovery Center will not host any more events for the spring season, including, we are sad to say, the wonderful CODE Green for kids programs that Bre Austin has coordinated all winter. We do plan for a robust summer season with new exhibits and regular hours, but of course that's subject to change. We'll make the wisest decisions we can as the situation evolves. Meanwhile we'll continue with electronic communications, and welcome your suggestions and offerings for online engagement opportunities. We will continue to offer frequent interesting posts on our outstanding Facebook page.

As an outdoors-focused organization, we hope to take advantage of our beautiful backcountry and get out into the natural world, and encourage you to do the same.  We're lucky to live in the American West, where Big Country invites healthy outdoor activities that people can engage in at safe distances. In these uncertain times, we're also fortunate to be part of a community that has always cultivated internal fortitude and grit as well as flexibility and good humor, and a strong instinct to support one another. In that spirit, we continue. 
Ralph's Links
 
March is the month of the Full Worm Moon 
https://mysticalraven.com/spirituality/17806/the-biggest-brightest-and-baddest-full-moon-of-the-year-is-almost-here?fbclid=IwAR0xUq11X154hXGEHUgqV--BXrRL7OPE8NOkJiOc10QlPlETDDBOxU8zgDk," 

the month of first buttercups and shooting stars in Wallowa country, and bird migrations https://ebird.org/science/status-and-trends?fbclid=IwAR0ZsVGHu7OQCtobvrlPYIiATkg_2v5QMjsKANtX3r2Os-dp4UUeYx_hx28

March will see "first-foods" observances among the Nimiipuu https://ctuir.org/first-foods-upland-vision and Numa  of Wallowa country. 

This is a month folks involved in agriculture, forestry and the grazing of livestock will pay close attention to snowpacks, water predictions and fire seasons.  This is the month of the greening of the trees, of cherry blossoms, of great horned owls and bald eagles on nests and Canada geese are paired and laying and working the greening grass.  


    --ralph
 
Ralph Anderson, having retired from a career with the Forest Service and as a consulting Wildlife Biologist, continues to offer his perspectives, insights and perusal of the current flow of science discoveries and its implications here in our monthly Tracks newsletter as well as more frequent postings on the Wallowology Facebook page.
 
 

Wallowology! Natural History Discovery Center, in downtown Joseph, opened to the public in June 2014.  We invite participants to explore and discover Eastern Oregon's lands and waters through exhibits, outings, and evening presentations by scientists, artists and others.

Our mission is to inform, inspire, and involve residents and visitors in the conservation of ecosystems and landscapes that support and sustain rural communities throughout Eastern Oregon.

Wallowology! is the public education division of Eastern Oregon Legacy Lands, a non-profit corporation whose purposes are scientific, educational, and charitable. EOLL's natural and cultural history programs include research, conservation planning, land acquisition, and policy development.

Copyright © 2019, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
PO Box 666
Joseph, Oregon 97846

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