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Welcome to the One Seventeen.

And welcome to 2018. There's no going back (not that you'd want to -- or do you?). You may have new resolutions in 2018, or you may be sticking with the resolutions made at a less typical time. As I reflect on the year past and that ahead, I have to begin and end with gratitude to get to jump into your inboxes every week. Because following the news sucks. So yes, the One Seventeen will keep going in 2018 (woo!) -- we're that much closer to 2030!

I hope you're staying warm if you're in the storms (worsened by climate change), and staying cool if you're in Australia. Here's to a year full of joy, flow states, SMART goals, and saying no!

DEVELOPMENTS
From NRDC

When it gets cold, Trump climate denial heats up.

Just days after Trump confused "climate" with "weather" in this tweet, the US announced that it would open up its entire coastline, east, west and Alaska, to offshore drilling. Then, they decided, why not try to make oil spills more likely by proposing to loosen safety rules meant to prevent them. 

Gender inequality in the spotlight.

At the golden globes, and also in general. What will the future hold for conversations around gender, power, and violence? Will the experiences of trans and gender-nonconforming people still be marginalized?

From the Guardian

China's solution to poverty: Mass relocation.

China's goal is to eradicate extreme poverty by 2020. Hundreds of millions of Chinese have lifted themselves out of poverty since the 80s, but China's now left with a 5.7 percent rural poverty rate as of 2016, and they're addressing it in ambitious fashion.

From Quartz

The 100-year capitalist experiment that keeps Appalachia poor, sick, and stuck on coal.

A deep-dive into the history of Appalachia shows exactly how corporate America has profited by passing on the costs of coal production to residents. 

Revenue vs. Well-being at Facebook.

Like many, you may have a resolution to do less scrolling on social media because it makes you sick and sad. Will Facebook address that and risk losing billions in revenue?

RESOURCE
From The Cut

Learn how to worry better.

"A little worry or anxiety can be motivating, too much can be counterproductive." A new study finds that worrying can, under the right circumstances, be harnessed for good.

SOMEONE TO WATCH
From Narratio.org

Ahmed Badr, the refugee who helps others share their stories.

A sophomore at Wesleyan, he started a website called Narratio where youth share their stories, a podcast for the UN's Together campaign, and it seems there's more to come.

RESEARCH

New data shows inequality is about to get worse.

Thomas Piketty, in his 2014 book Capital in the 21st Century, showed that inequality rises (a lot) when the wealthy accumulate wealth more quickly than the economy grows. But we could never really estimate how fast wealth grows, because we didn't have good data -- until now. The new paper, "The Rate of Return on Everything," concludes that if anything, Piketty underestimated how much inequality has grown in the past -- and that things in the future might be worse than we thought.

COMMENTARY

All told, 2017 wasn't terrible.

Really? Bill Gates recommends these tweets to prove it. And there is evidence -- from child mortality to literacy -- showing that 2017 was among the best years in human history. On the whole, Gates and others argue, the world is getting better.

I love you. Thanks for reading. :)

Please send all goal-setting chatbots, New Red Carpets, billions in revenue, 2018 reading lists, and UN podcasts to me at christianpetroske@gmail.com.

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The One Seventeen is a weekly email that presents the latest in how the world is doing on ending poverty, protecting the planet, and reducing inequality, delivered in plain English. Each email has 5 parts: Recent developments; a resource; a profile of someone to watch; a summary of recent research; and commentary from around the web. It's called the One Seventeen in reference to each one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
Copyright © 2018 Christian Petroske, All rights reserved.