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Youth Bullying Prevention Program…
It Takes A District

Tools, Tips, Research and Opportunities to Reduce Bullying
and Support A Positive School Climate
Welcome to the bullying prevention monthly email blast. This information is intended to provide ideas for you to use or share with your school to build a positive school culture and support all students. If this is your first time receiving this email, welcome! You have been designated as the point of contact for bullying prevention by your school.

Please feel free to reach out with any questions or requests for specific information that you would like to see in upcoming issues.
Strategies to create a supportive school climate. Building a positive school climate is critical for bullying prevention. This series from Edutopia presents several ideas about building school climate. I encourage you to review this list and see whether any of the ideas speak to the issues your school faces. 
 
How technology has changed middle childhood. Increased use of technology, greater mental health challenges, and increased awareness of identity issues have set this generation of tweens apart from those of the past. This piece may not provide answers, but it may help you better understand the ecosystem

Ellington’s “Own It” Campaign. People often ask me for recommendations on speakers, assemblies, or campaigns. I don’t have any: One-time events are not effective strategies for bullying prevention. What does work is when students themselves hold campaigns and learning events to benefit their communities. I’d like to give a shout-out to the students right here at Ellington for their “Own It” campaign—maybe this can go viral here in DC!
 
Remember that the Youth Bullying Prevention Act of 2012 requires all schools in the District of Columbia to provide information on all reported and confirmed bullying incidents. We will request these data at the end of the 2018/2019 school year. To assist in this process, we have provided a spreadsheet tool (.xlsx) to help you compile the data requested. We will be providing further guidance on submitting your data to OHR later this spring.
 
Suzanne Greenfield
Director, Citywide Bullying Prevention Program
Pronouns – she, her, hers 
 
District of Columbia Office of Human Rights
441 4th Street, N.W., Suite 570N
Washington, D.C.  20001
 
Main: 202.727.4559
Direct: 202.727.0455
Cell: 202.834.6376
Fax: 202.727.9589
District of Columbia Office of Human Rights
441 4th Street, N.W., Suite 570N
Washington, D.C.  20001

Main: 202.727.4559
Direct: 202.727.0455
Cell: 202.834.6376
Fax: 202.727.9589

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