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Youth Bullying Prevention Program…
It Takes A District

Tools, Tips, Research and Opportunities to Reduce Bullying
and Support A Positive School Climate
Welcome to the bullying prevention monthly email blast. This information is intended to provide ideas for you to use or share with your school to build a positive school culture and support all students. If this is your first time receiving this email, welcome! You have been designated as the point of contact for bullying prevention by your school.

Please feel free to reach out with any questions or requests for specific information that you would like to see in upcoming issues.
In February, we often think about relationships and how we support those around us. Just last month, the National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development at the Aspen Institute released its consensus report on what students need to thrive and succeed in schools. The report stresses the need to build and maintain relationships, both between students and between students and staff. Supportive relationships are the foundation for many of our efforts to keep students safe and promote their well-being: from developing students’ social and emotional skills, to preventing bullying and suicide, to ensuring their academic success.

Here are a few ways to hit the reset button, reconnect, and build relationships in your school:
  • Conduct fun ice-breaker activities to create a sense of community.
  • Encourage schoolwide games at lunch—scavenger hunt, bingo, trivia, or whatever game you want to play!
  • Have a dance break, a student vs. staff basketball game, or other activities that get students moving and interacting with their classmates and their teachers.
New Gillette ad challenges viewers to consider how adults role model bullying. The controversial ad can be used as a conversation starter (particularly in middle and high schools) to discuss how society’s assumptions of masculinity help build a culture around bullying.

Political rhetoric may contribute to student bullying behavior. This study finds that Virginia districts in which the majority of voters voted for Donald Trump in the last presidential election saw an uptick in bullying behavior. Although the District of Columbia did not vote for Trump in the last presidential election, our students and the adults around them may also be affected by the political conversations they see in the news.
 
Remember that the Youth Bullying Prevention Act of 2012 requires all schools in the District of Columbia to provide information on all reported and confirmed bullying incidents. We will request these data at the end of the 2018/2019 school year. To assist in this process, we have provided a spreadsheet tool (.xlsx) to help you compile the data requested. We will be providing further guidance on submitting your data to OHR later this spring.
 
Suzanne Greenfield
Director, Citywide Bullying Prevention Program
Pronouns – she, her, hers 
 
District of Columbia Office of Human Rights
441 4th Street, N.W., Suite 570N
Washington, D.C.  20001
 
Main: 202.727.4559
Direct: 202.727.0455
Cell: 202.834.6376
Fax: 202.727.9589
District of Columbia Office of Human Rights
441 4th Street, N.W., Suite 570N
Washington, D.C.  20001

Main: 202.727.4559
Direct: 202.727.0455
Cell: 202.834.6376
Fax: 202.727.9589

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