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Youth Bullying Prevention Program…
It Takes A District

Tools, Tips, Research and Opportunities to Reduce Bullying
and Support A Positive School Climate
Welcome to the bullying prevention monthly email blast. This information is intended to provide ideas for you to use or share with your school to build a positive school culture and support all students.

Please feel free to reach out with any questions or requests for specific information that you would like to see in upcoming issues.
Below, we present a few resources to support your work. The goal, as always, is to specifically address any reported incidents while also learning more about what makes schools safe.

Criminalization will not prevent bullying. While I am both pleased and relieved to say that DC is not looking to criminalize bullying behavior (as some states are), parents often raise such a possibility in their discussions with me. If parents initiate similar conversations with you, this piece provides a good overview about why criminalization is not a helpful or evidence-based response.

Self-cyberbullying is an emerging issue among students. Along with other self-harm behaviors, self-cyberbullying is a behavior we must be able to respond to when it presents itself.
 
Turning around schools may be as simple as having more meetings. This article describes the Building Assets, Reducing Risks approach to school turnaround, which focuses on bringing school staff together to better identify issues and develop solutions.  Although the approach may seem simple, the picture that results when teachers share their knowledge and put all the information together can be devastating. This is a doable, evidence-based practice that could help your school coordinate efforts and improve school climate.
 
On May 15, you will receive a separate email from me that contains a secure link to share your data on bullying reports, confirmed incidents, discipline responses to bullying incidents, and staff training. These data are required by the Youth Bullying Prevention Act of 2012. No individual school data will be released, and only aggregate data will be reported. Having no incident data (unless you represent an adult education campus) will raise a red flag, not the number of reports or actual incidents of bullying you have addressed. If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to reach out to me directly at Suzanne.Greenfield@dc.gov.

Remember that the Youth Bullying Prevention Act of 2012 requires all schools in the District of Columbia to provide information on all reported and confirmed bullying incidents every two years. We will request these data at the end of the 2017/2018 school year. To assist in this process, we have provided a spreadsheet tool (.xlsx) to help you compile the data requested.
 
Suzanne Greenfield
Director, Citywide Bullying Prevention Program
Pronouns – she, her, hers 
 
District of Columbia Office of Human Rights
441 4th Street, N.W., Suite 570N
Washington, D.C.  20001
 
Main: 202.727.4559
Direct: 202.727.0455
Cell: 202.834.6376
Fax: 202.727.9589
District of Columbia Office of Human Rights
441 4th Street, N.W., Suite 570N
Washington, D.C.  20001

Main: 202.727.4559
Direct: 202.727.0455
Cell: 202.834.6376
Fax: 202.727.9589

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District of Columbia Office of Human Rights
441 4th Street, N.W., Suite 570N
Washington, D.C.  20001

Main: 202.727.4559
Direct: 202.727.0455
Cell: 202.834.6376
Fax: 202.727.9589

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.